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Jul 27

[video]

mirrorwave13:

"I’m coming home now" - Felix Baumgartner

mirrorwave13:

"I’m coming home now" - Felix Baumgartner

[video]

[video]

minusmanhattan:

"Life should be lived on the edge. You have to exercise rebellion: to refuse to tape yourself to rules, to refuse your own success, to refuse to repeat yourself, to see every day, every year, every idea as a true challenge - and then you are going to live your life on a tightrope." - Philippe Petit
Photograph by Jean Louis Blondeau.

minusmanhattan:

"Life should be lived on the edge. You have to exercise rebellion: to refuse to tape yourself to rules, to refuse your own success, to refuse to repeat yourself, to see every day, every year, every idea as a true challenge - and then you are going to live your life on a tightrope." - Philippe Petit

Photograph by Jean Louis Blondeau.

secretcinema1:

Philippe Petit crossing between the Twin Towers, New York, 1974

secretcinema1:

Philippe Petit crossing between the Twin Towers, New York, 1974

Jul 26

(Source: kittenmeats)

(via princessdax)

[video]

(Source: thepursuitaesthetic, via homeandhearth)

(via princessdax)

(Source: gypsyastronaut, via gifs-gifs-gifs-gifs-gifs)

(Source: moviesisawin2014)

arsvitaest:

“Portrait of an Unknown Woman”
Author: Ivan Kramskoi (Russian, 1837-1887)Date: 1883Medium: Oil on canvasLocation: Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow
Portrait of an Unknown Woman caused a sensation when first exhibited, more as a result of the subject matter than the aesthetics of the work. A number of critics were indignant and condemned what they saw as a depiction of a haughty and immoral woman, or prostitute. One critic described the painting as a portrayal of “a coquette in a carriage,” while another wrote of “a provocatively beautiful woman, all in velvet and fur, throwing you a sneeringly sensuous glance from a luxurious carriage.” — Text adapted from Wikipedia

arsvitaest:

Portrait of an Unknown Woman”

Author: Ivan Kramskoi (Russian, 1837-1887)
Date: 1883
Medium: Oil on canvas
Location: Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

Portrait of an Unknown Woman caused a sensation when first exhibited, more as a result of the subject matter than the aesthetics of the work. A number of critics were indignant and condemned what they saw as a depiction of a haughty and immoral woman, or prostitute. One critic described the painting as a portrayal of “a coquette in a carriage,” while another wrote of “a provocatively beautiful woman, all in velvet and fur, throwing you a sneeringly sensuous glance from a luxurious carriage.”

— Text adapted from Wikipedia

(via post-impressionisms)


ralph goings
1978

ralph goings

1978

(Source: jesuisperdu, via andgatherer)